Direct contact with live poultry can get you infected by Salmonella

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A new research suggests people to wash their hands after touching hens and chickens. The research was carried out by the US Center of Prevention and Control of diseases which proved that the chickens can spread Salmonella bacteria. Since February, more than 200 people have fallen sick due to Salmonella, says the agency. This illness was found in other 44 states too.

Since 2011, this was the tenth time when CDC has reported the infection caused due to Salmonella in live poultry. About 70 outbreaks of Salmonella related to poultry birds have been announced since 2000. “People think that the bird infected by Salmonella bacteria will look ill by looking at him, but it is not like that”, a veterinarian of CDC, Dr. Nicholas told CNN last year. The bacteria are present on their legs, feathers and droppings. After getting infected by Salmonella, it takes twelve to seventy-two hours to get symptoms which include fever, abdominal cramping and diarrhea. This infection can also be recovered without any treatment after 4–7 days; however, diarrhea patients need a treatment. Salmonella bacteria mainly attacks on children and older people due to their weaker immunities.

Nicholas suggests to take correct information and advice from CDC before doing this business. As these birds have a great demand in market, the cases of illnesses are increasing day-by-day. The feeding pots used by the birds can be infected with Salmonella bacteria too, so washing hands is the best way to prevent. Also, make use of separate shoes while working with birds and restrict the birds from entering your house. When having eggs for meal, boil them thoroughly so as to kill bacteria.

The owners of infected chicks told investigators their birds are bought from various sources like supply stores, hatcheries and websites and others. So, health experts are warning such sellers to take precautions in order to stop Salmonella bacteria.

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